My fascination with art history comes from the way it has given me some of the most meaningful experiences I have had. For example, in April 2011, I visited “Naked: A Living Installation” at the Baryshnikov Arts Center by performance artists Eiko and Koma. The slow progression of their movements, the fragility of their pale bodies streaked with soil, and the intimacy between everyone in the quiet dark room evoked intense feelings in me. I felt as if I was watching two birds thrown from their nest, struggling to find each other. Though unintentional, their actions were underscored by the tragedy of Japan’s earthquakes.
 Looking back, it seems difficult to tool the experience into mere clumsy words. I’d rather remember the curve of their spines and preserve it in a charcoal drawing. Art is a form of visual dialogue that unlike language, has no barriers for understanding. It connects us, from the archaic ancient cave paintings to the primal movements of Eiko and Koma today, because it deals with the most primitive thing of all – our emotions. Art and emotion are rooted so deeply in us, that sometimes it’s difficult to distinctly identify and in my case, articulate in words. The ability of art to evoke emotions across societies separated by time and space is nothing short of magical to me.- Tasnim R.

My fascination with art history comes from the way it has given me some of the most meaningful experiences I have had. For example, in April 2011, I visited “Naked: A Living Installation” at the Baryshnikov Arts Center by performance artists Eiko and Koma. The slow progression of their movements, the fragility of their pale bodies streaked with soil, and the intimacy between everyone in the quiet dark room evoked intense feelings in me. I felt as if I was watching two birds thrown from their nest, struggling to find each other. Though unintentional, their actions were underscored by the tragedy of Japan’s earthquakes.

Looking back, it seems difficult to tool the experience into mere clumsy words. I’d rather remember the curve of their spines and preserve it in a charcoal drawing. Art is a form of visual dialogue that unlike language, has no barriers for understanding. It connects us, from the archaic ancient cave paintings to the primal movements of Eiko and Koma today, because it deals with the most primitive thing of all – our emotions. Art and emotion are rooted so deeply in us, that sometimes it’s difficult to distinctly identify and in my case, articulate in words. The ability of art to evoke emotions across societies separated by time and space is nothing short of magical to me.
- Tasnim R.

The Buddha